Old Friends

My last blog, and final Virginia blog, was "A Tale of Seven Birds." I could have called this one "A Tale of Four." It's a story about 4 birds and my assorted adventures photographing them. It's also a quick read. You'll see why in a moment. I've referred to birds as markers, fellow travelers, nature's … Continue reading Old Friends

A Tale of Seven Birds

The Carolina Wren featured in "Some Elements of a Good Photo" signaled the end of the COVID-19 state of emergency. But, it didn't know about the Delta variant and the return to mask mandates. The Common Yellowthroat never has to give mask mandates a second thought. It's forever attired in a black one. I wrote … Continue reading A Tale of Seven Birds

The Birds of Spring

Many of you enjoyed the Carolina Wren sound recordings in the last blog. I love recording birds and listening to the results. But I especially enjoy looking at the spectrograms, where I can "see" the sounds and learn more about them. Birds' songs and calls are a lot more interesting and complex than many people … Continue reading The Birds of Spring

New Beginnings

We ended "A Late Winter's Tale" with a joke book recommendation. BTW, I hope some of you ordered Wayne's book. We'll begin this one with an edited/accessorized version of a photo that appeared at the end of "Finding Humor, Finding Birds." One of the wonderful things about digital photos is that you can alter them. … Continue reading New Beginnings

It’s All About Light

You know it's getting later in the fall when Yellow-crowned Night Herons have left the Mid-Atlantic, Red-tailed Hawk numbers are peaking at Cape May, and neighbors are soliciting fellow neighbors for unwanted pumpkins. An immature YCNH hung on in Chesapeake, VA until the end of October. Pardon me for using the alpha code there, but … Continue reading It’s All About Light

Fieldcraft, Part Two

In my last blog, "Fieldcraft," I described several situations where my being still and quiet in the field for over 5 minutes enabled me to get very close to—and get decent close-up photos of—a Red-tailed Hawk, a Carolina Wren, and a Song Sparrow. I also relayed Keith Freeburn's story. Keith waited in one spot for … Continue reading Fieldcraft, Part Two

More Bird Notes

Birds—especially small birds—are often obscured by stuff in the field. That makes it tricky for both bird watchers and photographers. I'm reminded of Gilda Radner's "It's always something," or my friend Betty Sue Cohen's "There's always a stick, or a twig, or a leaf [in the way]." Natural Stuff Below is an adult female Northern … Continue reading More Bird Notes

Bird Notes

No doubt, some of you have Green Heron fatigue. I understand. But I need to share a few more photos with you. Please bear with me. This is a young bird getting ready to leave for the winter. As I understand it, the bird is headed for a small lagoon in Punta Cana. The bird … Continue reading Bird Notes

Birds Are Markers

Prior to his death in 1801 at Montpelier in Orange County, Virginia, James Madison Sr., the father our 4th president, James Madison Jr., kept a weather journal. He and other family members added garden observations in the margins. According to Hillary Hicks, who wrote "'A Paradise of Roses': Flowers at Montpelier," those observations were recorded … Continue reading Birds Are Markers