Photos and Commentary

Robin, a blog reader, sent me this after reading "Hooded Bliss," "Wonderful photos and commentary. You taught me new things about the hoodies. Thanks so much for sharing!" I always like it when readers tell me they learned something from the blog. I also like it when they provide me with good ideas for titles! … Continue reading Photos and Commentary

Great Blue to Best Quality

I wrapped up "A Close Encounter," a blog I published midday on 10/16, with these words: "Any day now, the [young Green Heron] will make it’s first trip, its maiden voyage, from the breeding grounds where it was born to its wintering grounds. It’ll probably leave during the night. I’ll revisit the lakeshore a few … Continue reading Great Blue to Best Quality

A Close Encounter

Since a number of you enjoyed my recent Green Heron photos and the unusual story I shared on 10/14, I thought I'd throw together an impromptu post to fill you in on the details. I've been tracking a juvenile Green Heron that's spending time along the shore of Gifford Pinchot Lake in York, Pennsylvania. The … Continue reading A Close Encounter

Old Friends

My last blog, and final Virginia blog, was "A Tale of Seven Birds." I could have called this one "A Tale of Four." It's a story about 4 birds and my assorted adventures photographing them. It's also a quick read. You'll see why in a moment. I've referred to birds as markers, fellow travelers, nature's … Continue reading Old Friends

A Tale of Seven Birds

The Carolina Wren featured in "Some Elements of a Good Photo" signaled the end of the COVID-19 state of emergency. But, it didn't know about the Delta variant and the return to mask mandates. The Common Yellowthroat never has to give mask mandates a second thought. It's forever attired in a black one. I wrote … Continue reading A Tale of Seven Birds

The Birds of Spring

Many of you enjoyed the Carolina Wren sound recordings in the last blog. I love recording birds and listening to the results. But I especially enjoy looking at the spectrograms, where I can "see" the sounds and learn more about them. Birds' songs and calls are a lot more interesting and complex than many people … Continue reading The Birds of Spring

New Beginnings

We ended "A Late Winter's Tale" with a joke book recommendation. BTW, I hope some of you ordered Wayne's book. We'll begin this one with an edited/accessorized version of a photo that appeared at the end of "Finding Humor, Finding Birds." One of the wonderful things about digital photos is that you can alter them. … Continue reading New Beginnings

It’s All About Light

You know it's getting later in the fall when Yellow-crowned Night Herons have left the Mid-Atlantic, Red-tailed Hawk numbers are peaking at Cape May, and neighbors are soliciting fellow neighbors for unwanted pumpkins. An immature YCNH hung on in Chesapeake, VA until the end of October. Pardon me for using the alpha code there, but … Continue reading It’s All About Light

Fieldcraft, Part Two

In my last blog, "Fieldcraft," I described several situations where my being still and quiet in the field for over 5 minutes enabled me to get very close to—and get decent close-up photos of—a Red-tailed Hawk, a Carolina Wren, and a Song Sparrow. I also relayed Keith Freeburn's story. Keith waited in one spot for … Continue reading Fieldcraft, Part Two

More Bird Notes

Birds—especially small birds—are often obscured by stuff in the field. That makes it tricky for both bird watchers and photographers. I'm reminded of Gilda Radner's "It's always something," or my friend Betty Sue Cohen's "There's always a stick, or a twig, or a leaf [in the way]." Natural Stuff Below is an adult female Northern … Continue reading More Bird Notes