Fieldcraft and Light

In my last few blog posts, I made a big deal about fieldcraft and light. When it comes to photographing wildlife, few things are more important than an appreciation of the two. Ironically, I just read a few articles that make that point clearly. First, I read a story about Beverly Meekins. Beverly is a North … Continue reading Fieldcraft and Light

Stalking a Great Blue

It takes planning to create good images. That was one of the messages in "It's All About Light." What follows is a quick "planning" case study and story. On the morning of 10/15, the outdoor lighting was extraordinary. It met the quality-of-light test and then some. It was one of those mornings. I decided to … Continue reading Stalking a Great Blue

It’s All About Light

You know it's getting later in the fall when Yellow-crowned Night Herons have left the Mid-Atlantic, Red-tailed Hawk numbers are peaking at Cape May, and neighbors are soliciting fellow neighbors for unwanted pumpkins. An immature YCNH hung on in Chesapeake, VA until the end of October. Pardon me for using the alpha code there, but … Continue reading It’s All About Light

Fieldcraft, Part Two

In my last blog, "Fieldcraft," I described several situations where my being still and quiet in the field for over 5 minutes enabled me to get very close to—and get decent close-up photos of—a Red-tailed Hawk, a Carolina Wren, and a Song Sparrow. I also relayed Keith Freeburn's story. Keith waited in one spot for … Continue reading Fieldcraft, Part Two

Coexisting

In my last blog, "More Bird Notes," I referred to the Common Yellowthroat, a New World wood warbler, as the "raccoon warbler." I also referred to the Brown Thrasher as the "chirpa chirpa bird." I received a few questions about the name, "raccoon warbler," since I'd presented a photo of a younger female that bore … Continue reading Coexisting

More Bird Notes

Birds—especially small birds—are often obscured by stuff in the field. That makes it tricky for both bird watchers and photographers. I'm reminded of Gilda Radner's "It's always something," or my friend Betty Sue Cohen's "There's always a stick, or a twig, or a leaf [in the way]." Natural Stuff Below is an adult female Northern … Continue reading More Bird Notes

End of Season Bird Photos and Photo Tips

Maybe we should just call this the "Green Heron Blog." I continue to devote a lot of space to that popular bird. I continue to devote a lot of space to photography, too. Stan, an 8th-grade teacher (and doing God's work), left a comment after reading "Birds Are Markers." Here's some of what he wrote: … Continue reading End of Season Bird Photos and Photo Tips

Birds Are Markers

Prior to his death in 1801 at Montpelier in Orange County, Virginia, James Madison Sr., the father our 4th president, James Madison Jr., kept a weather journal. He and other family members added garden observations in the margins. According to Hillary Hicks, who wrote "'A Paradise of Roses': Flowers at Montpelier," those observations were recorded … Continue reading Birds Are Markers

A Green Heron Album

This post is a continuation of "A Green Heron Colony." Many thanks to those of you who read it and enjoyed it. Not that long ago, the words "Green Heron Album" might have conjured up a 33 1/3 LP, a paper sleeve, and a compelling, if not enigmatic, album cover. Not anymore. What follows isn't … Continue reading A Green Heron Album

A Green Heron Colony

Douglas, a fellow FM Forums member, just posted some awe-inspiring Green Heron nestling photos. He took them 15 feet from the birds' natal tree—one of many trees that line a Maryland lake. A few of the photos feature a nestling being fed by a parent, a spectacle everyone should see at least once. Karl's comment, … Continue reading A Green Heron Colony