The Scuffletown Creek Hunters, Cont’d

Many loved Joanne Howl's touching European Starling story in "A Life Lesson." One reader commented that it wasn't just a story about starlings, it was a "lesson about prejudice." I responded that she'd made a great point. Another reader commented that starlings were "hoodlums." I responded, "WE might be the real hoodlums." I don't think … Continue reading The Scuffletown Creek Hunters, Cont’d

The Scuffletown Creek Hunters

Scuffletown Creek, an Elizabeth River tributary in Chesapeake, VA, was a mess. I wrote about it in "The Same River Twice." Dave and Lindsay, two old-timers who grew up nearby, remember houseboats in the creek, homes with outhouses lining the creek, and sewage and diesel fuel flowing into the creek. They remember tapping the creek … Continue reading The Scuffletown Creek Hunters

A Life Lesson

I've received a lot of feedback since publishing "All God's Critters" and "A Few Random Thoughts." I'm grateful so many read them. What follows is a quick summary with a couple of personal thoughts thrown in. Some people don't like European Starlings. Their scientific name, Sturnus vulgaris, could have something to do with it. Or … Continue reading A Life Lesson

A Few Random Thoughts

I'd like to open with this shot of a Canada Goose flying above the surface of Scott's Creek in Portsmouth, VA. Talk about a species that is an awesome photo target. To me, this is a quintessential fall photo. Canada Geese are considered "harbingers of the changing seasons." This is also a quintessential goose photo. … Continue reading A Few Random Thoughts

All God’s Critters

Many of you enjoyed the European Starling photo and what I wrote about starlings in "Bird and Photograph Locally." Here's that late November photo again. Ann, a VMD and blog follower, wrote: "I just had to tell you that I agree totally with you about the vilified starlings. They can be quite handsome birds especially … Continue reading All God’s Critters

Bird and Photograph Locally

I'm an unabashed bird lover and watcher. So are many of you. Birds have aesthetic appeal and they're captivating. They provide a connection to nature. They take us outside ourselves and our preoccupations. Some believe they provide a connection to God. A Local Jaunt–Sketch #1 A week ago I arose early and left a note … Continue reading Bird and Photograph Locally

Fieldcraft and Light

In my last few blog posts, I made a big deal about fieldcraft and light. When it comes to photographing wildlife, few things are more important than an appreciation of the two. Ironically, I just read a few articles that make that point clearly. First, I read a story about Beverly Meekins. Beverly is a North … Continue reading Fieldcraft and Light

Stalking a Great Blue

It takes planning to create good images. That was one of the messages in "It's All About Light." What follows is a quick "planning" case study and story. On the morning of 10/15, the outdoor lighting was extraordinary. It met the quality-of-light test and then some. It was one of those mornings. I decided to … Continue reading Stalking a Great Blue

It’s All About Light

You know it's getting later in the fall when Yellow-crowned Night Herons have left the Mid-Atlantic, Red-tailed Hawk numbers are peaking at Cape May, and neighbors are soliciting fellow neighbors for unwanted pumpkins. An immature YCNH hung on in Chesapeake, VA until the end of October. Pardon me for using the alpha code there, but … Continue reading It’s All About Light

Fieldcraft, Part Two

In my last blog, "Fieldcraft," I described several situations where my being still and quiet in the field for over 5 minutes enabled me to get very close to—and get decent close-up photos of—a Red-tailed Hawk, a Carolina Wren, and a Song Sparrow. I also relayed Keith Freeburn's story. Keith waited in one spot for … Continue reading Fieldcraft, Part Two